Jacket

5 ways to Green Your Jacket

  1. Buy an eco-friendly jacket

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    Options for eco-friendly jackets and coats are popping up everywhere, and include fibers like organic cotton, hemp, bamboo, or silk.

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  2. Choose a cruelty-free jacket

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    Staying away from clothes made from fur, leather, or wool can ensure that you are not supporting inhumane industry practices.

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  3. Use "wet" dry cleaning

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    This is a good option for all of your dry-clean only clothes, including your jacket. It's easier on the earth and your home's indoor air, too.

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  4. Recycle old clothing

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    Swap a jacket with a friend. Donate your old jacket to—or buy your next jacket from—a thrift store or aid organization.

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  5. Use liquid carbon dioxide dry cleaning (CO2)

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    This is a nontoxic option available at certain commercial cleaners throughout the country. We'll make it easy to find one in your area.

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Comments

10/30/2008
4:14pm
alanh

The claim that production of a real fur garment requires "60 times more energy than fake" is based on a very misleading fallacy. The "study" on which this statement is based was first printed as an annex to a 1980 anti-fur book published by the Animal Welfare Institute. In making this calculation, the author estimated the energy equivalent of the FEED consumed by farmed mink in a year and compared it to the energy value of the OIL used to make fake furs. He ignored the fact that mink feed is primarily waste products from our own food-production system (therefore recycled and renewable), as opposed to the non-renewable (petrochemical)energy used to make synthetics. The comparison is therefore completely meaningless, but activists have repeated it ever since. For a different view of fur, please visit www.FurIsGreen.com.

10/31/2008
2:08pm
Mateo

alanh, thanks for pointing this out. we checked out furisgreen.com and did not find it credible/objective enough to use as a resource on our site. however, we also looked into the stat and it does seem that the embedded energy study is fairly dated and we will update this section. ultimately, depending on a consumer's values, fur could be more sustainable than petrol-based synthetics.

if someone knows of a great study or website that settles the fur vs synthetic issue (from an LCA standpoint) please bring it to our attention! thanks.

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